Sicily school infections updated to February 22: 1350 positive pupils

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The USR for Sicily publishes the data on pupil infections from Covid-19 updated to 22 February. The schools surveyed are 792, or 92%. Here is the full picture

In the last column of the table. writes the USR, the average ratio of positive pupils / classes with positive pupils; this report analyzes the distribution of positive cases of students from Covid-19 among the classes.

In particular, the closer the ratio is to 1, the more it highlights a situation with the absence of outbreaks (or clusters) or in which, in any case, the latter are very limited in number. The range of this ratio can fall between the minimum value of 1 and the theoretical maximum value corresponding to the average number of pupils per class in a Sicilian school (specifically 19 pupils).

As regards only the kindergarten and first cycle schools, from the comparison with the data of last week, February 15, 2021, it is highlighted that the incidence of positive pupils has undergone a decrease, passing from 0.23% last week to the current one. 0.20%.

Considering the entire observation period, from November 19, 2020 to today, the trend in the incidence of COVID-19 positive pupils is confirmed to be decreasing.

This value went from 0.46% on November 19, 2020 to 0.20% on February 22, 2021. In absolute value, compared to November 19, 2020, there is a decrease equal to 95 fewer positive children for children (- 46%), 467 for primary school (-51%) and 576 for grade I (-56%).

On the other hand, considering only the second cycle schools, the comparison between the previous week and the current one shows a decrease in the incidence of COVID-19 positive pupils. This value went from 0.22% on 8 February 2021, the first week of the survey, to the current 0.20%.

It should be noted that the data are comparable since for the weeks in which the survey was carried out, the feedback from schools was in a range of 93% – 98% compared to the kindergartens and first cycle schools in the region.

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